“First GF Bread” Pics from my July 300 Students

We’ve mentioned several times over the last week or so that we’ve updated and expanded our cooking classes. So today I wanted to tell you exactly what is in your first class: Gluten Free Bread 101, so that you’ll a better idea of what to expect and whether it’s right for you.

The Goal: The goal for this class is pretty simple, but really awesome at the same time.

You are going to bake a loaf of amazing bread that you can eat in your own kitchen.

If it’s been a while since you’ve had a loaf of really great bread right out of the oven, you have no idea how good that first slice is going to taste. And it doesn’t matter if you’re a complete newbie, or if you have additional allergies to worry about. We will teach you how to bake a loaf of amazing bread right in your own kitchen.

The How: We’ve broken GF Bread 101 into 3 sessions, so you can plan ahead for when you’re going to have time to focus. In Session 1, you’re going to read about the basics of bread making, choose a recipe that works for you, and then make your shopping list.

In Session 2, you’re going to watch the video on how to make GF bread, and then read the most frequently asked questions that we get about GF bread. Then in Session 3, you’re going to bake your own loaf. It’s simple, easy, and pretty much foolproof.

The Recipes: We’ve got three different recipes in GF Bread 101 that are designed to help those of us with multiple allergies or intolerances. The class has the regular GF bread recipe, a gluten free and corn free recipe, and a gluten free, yeast free recipe.

And if none of those work for you (like say, you can’t eat rice), we’ve got you covered with an entire article full of additional substitution ideas.

GF Bread 101 - Miller

11496_545267598873682_1189645817_n

1001134_10200233523660962_748015360_n

Gluten Free Bread 101 - Becci

The Results: Several of the July 300 students have already finished their first loaf of bread (pics above). Let them tell you about it in their own words:

“Wooohoooo…it smells wonderful… Now cooling…oh my goodness. I am dying here!” and then a few minutes later, “Couldn’t wait any longer…my kryptonite was calling! Here is the bread sliced off end…never looked so pretty and tastes amazing with butter smeared in it!”

“I use to make loaves of sourdough bread that I’ve really missed since having to go gluten free. This gluten free sandwich bread was so tasty, coming out of my bread machine, that I have a feeling it definitely will be made more frequently. I’m waiting on my shipment of flour to make the “corn free” bread and can’t wait to try that recipe out soon. Now back to butter another slice before my husband gets home…”

“This is my first attempt at sandwich bread without corn. As you can see, this bread came out beautifully and was amenable to my slicer!”


Would you Like to Bake Your First Loaf of Gluten Free Bread?
Sign up for classes now!
Special Pricing and Bonuses for the July 300 Are Only Available Until July 25th!

Comments

  1. The recipes are great! I am going to do sub rolls today.

  2. Jeannine Duke says:

    Gluten free Ha. I started a glutinous free diet and my arthritis started acting up in a big way. (So did my friends) Then I realized there is potato flour or starch are in ALL my home made baked goods. No good potatoes are a nightshade. Also I do not eat corn or tapioca. Sooo what can I use??? I am looking at arrowroot and mung bean starch. All the flour recipes have two kinds of starch in them. Any info will help. I am a baker and am sure others (my clients) will benefit from this knowledge.

    • I’ve not found it necessary to use two starches. I keep it simple and just use one. You’ll just have to try the arrowroot and mung been starch and see how the recipes turn out. Hopefully you can find a recipe to use where that starch change is the only one that you need to make. If the recipes are written with weight measurements, that will be even better because it eliminates variables, other than the starch substitution, that could affect the outcome. Sweet rice flour is very much like a starch too, so you might try that too. I’ve found it at Asian groceries and Amazon.

  3. Jeannine Duke says:

    Tks so much. I’ll do what I can.

Speak Your Mind

*