Finally, Really Good Sandwich Bread: Our Favorite Gluten Free Bread Recipe

Gluten free bread is a staple of our diet.

When John first started a gluten free diet we searched through grocery store after grocery store hunting the elusive frozen rice bread that our internet searches indicated should be there.

We finally found some and, upon trying it, promptly spit it out. It was horrible!

John kept eating it though, because what else is one to do when you don’t know how to cook and your girlfriend is away at grad school.

By the time we married the following year, we had a bread machine and Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Bread Mix. Thus started the four year saga of baking gluten free bread that was either dense, wet, full of air holes, or incredibly misshapen.

At last count we’ve been through three different recipes plus innumerable variations of each when I just couldn’t keep my hands off the recipe (which would be at least 95% of the time). But do not be disheartened – Finally, after four years, I have worked out a recipe that consistently turns out really good sandwich bread.

One of the reasons that I really like this bread recipe is that the flours in it are relatively inexpensive. And, at least in Birmingham, they are widely available. I can get all of the different flours at our local Wal-mart.

The bread is also very easy to make, especially once you have the recipe memorized from making it frequently. I even do shortcuts now and often  mix everything up in one bowl. However, if you’re trying this recipe for the first time, I do recommend that you follow the recipe as closely as possible.

Finally! Really Good Gluten Free Sandwich Bread

1 Tbsp. bread machine yeast
1 Tbsp. sugar
12 oz. water (1.5 c) (105 degrees or a little less than hot)

11 oz. (approx 2.5 c) GFCS’gluten free flour mix
2 tsp. xanthan gum
1 tsp. salt

3 eggs (or 9 Tbsp. water and 3 Tbsp. ground flax seed)
1 ½ Tbsp. oil
1 tsp. cider vinegar

Instructions

1. Start by combining the yeast and sugar in a small bowl (I use the smallest in my set of three nested mixing bowls). Add the water while gently stirring the yeast and sugar. Let this mixture sit while you mix the rest of the ingredients – bubbles and foam should form if the yeast is happy.

2. Combine the flour mix, xanthan gum and salt in the largest mixing bowl and stir well.

3. In a third bowl, whisk the eggs, oil and vinegar until the eggs are a bit frothy.

4. By this point the yeast mixture should be foamy, so you can pour the two liquid mixtures into the flour mixture. Blend the dough with a mixer for 4 minutes.

Bread Machine Directions:

Scoop your dough into the bread machine and smooth the top of the dough. I bake my bread using an 80 minute setting that allows for 20 minutes of kneading, 18 minutes of rise, and 42 minutes of baking. However, since I don’t use the paddle in by bread machine, I’m effectively doing a 38 minute rise and a 42 minute bake. (The advantage of not using the paddle is that you don’t end up with a hole in the bottom of your bread.)

Conventional Oven Directions:

Scoop the dough into a greased loaf pan. Allow the dough to rise in a warm area until is is about 1 inch from the top of the pan. Then bake at 375 degrees for 50 – 60 minutes.

Other Notes:

  • If you are allergic to corn I’ve developed a corn free version of this recipe that uses tapioca starch, almond flour, and guar gum. The recipe is currently available as part of the Gluten Free Bread 101 class
  • If you’re looking for a gluten free milk bread recipe, you can make this bread using milk instead of water. In fact, I originally developed it with milk and then switched it to water to cut down on the cost and to make it casein free. If you are on a dairy-free diet, then you may use a plain gluten free non-dairy milk..
  • If you are allergic to eggs, use the flax substitute listed in the recipe, or follow the instructions on your favorite egg replacement powder. When I use the flax eggs, the bread is usually slightly wetter than otherwise.


Comments

  1. I opened your site through Internet Explorer instead of Firefox (which I normally use) and there was the photo and link. Sorry! Don’t know why Firefox is like that sometimes ;o(

  2. Hi Mary Frances,

    I just stumbled upon your site whilst looking for GF biscuits and fell in love. The biscuits were a huge hit with my non GF family (mom kept stealing them fresh from the oven) and also loved this yummy sandwhich bread recipe. The reason I am writing this long post is because I thought the texture of that bread would make a wonderful dessert bread. My dad was diagnosed with Celiac about a year ago, I’ve been GF ever since we found out, and he really loves orange and chocolate. Thus I decided to experiment with turning this recipe into an Chocolate Chip Orange bread and I would really love to share it, hope that’s alright…

    I am not a baker, but have found your recipes to be wonderful and easy to work with. I only tailored it a tiny bit and the result was amazing.

    Chocolate Chip Orange Bread
    1 Tbsp. active dry yeast
    1 Tbsp. sugar
    1 ½ c. water (105 degrees or a little less than hot)

    2 ½ cups “Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Mix Recipe”
    2 tsp. xanthan gum
    1tsp. salt
    (To this I added 2 Tbs. Sugar, and ½ tsp. of baking powder, I also added roughly 1/3-½ cup of extra flour mix)

    2 eggs (or 6 Tbsp. water and 2 Tbsp. ground flax seed)
    1 ½ Tbsp. oil
    1 tsp. cider vinegar
    (To this I added 2½ tsp. vanilla and an extra ½ tsp. of oil)
    (I also just realized that I totally goofed and only added 1 egg, but the texture is still wonderfully spongy)

    After following the directions, I folded in the zest of one navel orange and 1 cup of chocolate chips (I used a mixture of semi-sweet and bittersweet) and then put the mixture into a greased 9×5 baking pan. Before I put it in the oven, I brushed the top with a bit of oil and sprinkled it with sugar. This made the bread turn out especially glossy and delicious. Then I just popped it into the oven at 350 degrees. It baked up to the size of a normal loaf of bread and I was shocked, I think that was because I didn’t let it rise beforehand so the bread got trapped at that wonderful volume, the baking powder may have helped as well. In my (gas) oven, which takes longer to cook things than most, the bread took about 45 minutes.

    For a first try it turned out great! I could barely wait for it to cool and immediately spread the bread with some salted butter and poured myself a glass of milk, Yum!

    In hindsight, the bread itself wasn’t very sweet so I might add more sugar next time, however the mild flavor of the bread was very balanced with the orange zest and chocolate.

    Thank you so much for this wonderful site, it has given me so much hope and excitement. I hope the New Year is treating you and your family very well and can’t wait for all the great recipes this year will bring!

    -Lauren

  3. I am new at this gluten free cooking, and I want to make homemade bread in the oven(Don’t have a bread machine) and I can’t use regular yeast(have a yeast problem) been told to use nutrional yeast because it is deactivated, so how can i make bread in the oven with nutrional yeast, that will be moist and not not crumbly.Please help!

    • @Teresa: Nutritional yeast does not rise at all so you can’t use it in baking. Check the comments in my post on All Purpose Flour Mix (use the search box or the link in the sidebar to find it). Diana recently posted a recipe for cinnamon raisin bread that does not use yeast in the comments section of that post. That recipe should give you a starting point…just leave out the cinnamon and raisins for now, and maybe cutback on the sugar a bit.

  4. c fregosi says:

    I tried this for the first time yesterday and my husband loved it. He said finally he had a bread that didn’t crumble and that tasted good without toasting. I let it rise normal in a loaf pan and baked it at 375 and it was fine. My son didn’t have cider vinegar here but I used a GF Balsamic vinegar and other than making the bread darker didn’t seem to alter anything else. Thanks for your work to help the bread loving GF community!

  5. Rose then fell…hmmm

    I finally made this, using a mixture of tapioca flour, millet flour, potato starch, corn starch and sweet rice flour. I set my zoji for the homemade setting of:

    preheat 15 mins
    knead 1-30 mins
    rise 2-55 mins
    bake 55 mins

    It rose really high before baking (maybe 5 or 6 inches?), then fell down until I had a 2 inch high loaf that was a little more moist than it needed to be. It will be fine tomorrow, but I’m trying to perfect this to teach a friend who is GF and don’t think this is going to cut it :). With my traditional bread when it rises then falls I reduce the yeast a little and maybe the liquid…so I’m wondering if I need a tiny bit more flour, more water, or something entirely different. Please share if this happened to you. I feel I’ve read comments that it has at one time or another, but this post is getting so many posts, trying to read through and find this answer is going to take forever ;-).

  6. My 2 cents: First, because it is GF flour you only have to mix and do not need to knead. Second, it sounds like you let it rise for too long and then didn’t bake it long enough. I would cut back on the rise time just until it doubles in the breadmaker and then bake it until the temp is 210.

    just a tip, I have found that adding another egg to the recipe makes for a fluffier bread. But I do not bake with a machine so…I’m not sure how this will work in your breadmaker.

  7. Oh. You also may want to simplify your flours. I mix 1 1/4 cup of brown rice, with 1/2 cup of potato starch and 1 cup of corn starch – I know its not as healthy as the original recipe, but it sure tastes good.

    Also, I use 3 eggs (instead of 2) and 2 tsp of vinegar (instead of 1) and 2 tbs. of oil (instead of 1) and it comes out like a boule.

    My whole family goes wild for by bread (GF and not).

  8. One more tip from MF (I think). I mix everything up with an electric mixer for 2 minutes or so before I put it in the pan. I think this develops the gluten better and makes for a fluffier bread.

    You inspired me. I am baking a batch of mini-loafs right not.

    J

  9. Mixing it thoroughly, first, helps develop the xanthan gum. I put mine in my kitchenaide with the paddle attachment and let it run on the lowest setting for about 5 minutes before transferring it into a greased loaf pan to rise for about 20 minutes. Then, into a 375 degree preheated oven for 60 minutes. It comes out perfect.

  10. I need help!!! I’ve tried making the sandwich bread and a couple of the muffin recipes and they all have turned out the same….looking like they didn’t raise/cook enough and overly moist and almost doughy in the middle. With the last set of muffins I left them in almost 15 minutes longer than I should have and they still turned out the same. What could I be doing wrong???

  11. @ Pam, did you read through the previous postings on this log? Perhaps the answer is already there.

  12. I tried this recipe before using Hodgsons Brown Rice Flour (cheap) instead of Bob’s and 4 tsp gelatin in place of the xantham gum. Dough consistency was like thick pancake batter. Rose to the top of the pan pretty quickly and baked well at 350F in 40min. The Hodgsons flour is fairly coarse. That rough texture contributed alot to a “cornbread” like taste. Loaf was flat-topped and sunk a bit. Slices fell apart easily. Nothing special.

    NOW, I tried this again today using Domata flour and 2 tsp of guar gum. Thank God! This dough was like that of a fine bleached wheat flour loaf. I rolled it into a regular shape and gave it 30 min to rise in 120F oven. It rose up like regular bread! Baked it at 360F for 40 min till it pulled away from the pan edges and was golden. Rubbed the top with butter and let it cool in the pan. I would swear this is WonderBread. A fresh warm piece (couldn’t wait) tasted almost like cake. Yumm :)

    • It’s amazing the difference a little xanthan gum makes. The Domata flour already has the xanthan gum mixed in. Gelatin on the other hand is not a good substitute for xanthan gum.

      The recipe does work well with the Domata flour. It tastes kinda “blah” to me, but that’s probably because I haven’t eat “white bread” in a decade =)

  13. Okay, I must admit I got a little over-excited about my first piece of decent bread in 2 months. Using Domata flour this recipe tastes more like potato bread than anything once cooled to room temp and sliced.
    It does seem to rise very well and has crust that doesn’t peel away too easily. Yes, it’s a bit blah but still a far cry from the typical short, coarse and overly dense GF breads I’ve tried so far. Thanks much!

  14. DIANE WHITE says:

    I have spent countless hours going through websites looking for a rice bread recipe and just finished reading everyone’s comments on your sandwich bread. I think I want to try this. First I don’t need it to be gluten free so what fours would you suggest I use for the mix. I can’t have eggs so will use the sub up above. I don’t have a bread machine so I have jotted down some of the suggestions for using the oven. Guess I will have to knead the dough since it won’t be gluten free. I am really anxious to try this as the breads you buy are very expensive and horrible. Thanks for any input!

    • @Diane White: I have actually never made a loaf of bread that wasn’t gluten free, so I’m afraid I can’t be of much help in advising you on how to make a gluten containing loaf of this bread.

  15. DIANE WHITE says:

    IN THAT CASE THEN I WILL MAKE IT GLUTEN FREE. THAT IS FINE WITH ME. WHAT FLOURS WOULD YOU SUGGEST I USE. I HAVE BROWN RICE FLOUR AND WHITE RICE FLOUR. THANKS

  16. DIANE WHITE says:

    I FOUND THE COMBO OF FLOURS ON THE NEXT PAGE. THANKS ANY WAY. IF A RECIPE CALLS FOR AN EGG, IS THERE A SUBSTITUTE FOR EGGS. CAN’T HAVE ANY DAIRY. THANKS

  17. plumagination says:

    I’m just starting to go gluten free, and i’ve been researching bread recipes. your flour mix i adapted it to
    3 parts brown rice flour
    3 parts tapioca
    2 parts sorghum
    1 part almond meal
    i made a loaf in our new bread machine using dry active yeast the textue of the bread was good but the flavor came out really yeasty, it was inedible. Im going to try again today with quick rise yeast. and see if it makes a difference. also my bread machine does not have an 80min setting. i was thinking of just putting it on the dough setting and then baking it in the oven. The bread machine is still new to me i don’t quite relate with it yet. any input or suggestions would be very much appriciated.

  18. Carolyn says:

    Thank you for this wonderful recipe. I made my first ever batch of GF homemade bread today and it turned out great. I followed the recipe exactly and used a Magic Chef bread machine from Wal-Mart and cooked it on Rapid setting. The crust was crisp and golden and the inside was perfect! Thanks again!

    Carolyn

  19. If you don’t have a loaf pan on hand, use an ordinary one-pound coffee can. Just make sure to grease it well and to put it on the lowest rack in the oven. You’ll end up with a cylindrical loaf for beautiful round sandwiches.

  20. Melissa says:

    What’s the best way to store the bread, what to wrap it in and on the counter or refrigerated?

    Melissa

  21. Debbie Gibbons says:

    My husband is allergic to wheat so we are trying lots of new things that make him feel “normal”. I tried your Sandwich Bread recipe and the texture was great but my husband would like it to be a little sweeter. Can I add more sugar without ruining it? (I am not an expert bread maker.) How about adding Cinnamon and Raisins for another taste sensation? Thanks so much.

  22. @Melissa,

    I use a plastic cake cover to store my bread on the counter. If I put it in the fridge, even if covered, it gets dry and crumbly. If someone else has a better idea, I’d love to hear/read it. :)

  23. @Debbie,

    I mixed in 1 Cup of Raisins and 1 Tsp. of cinnamon with a dash of nutmeg and it turned out great.

  24. @Debbie,

    I mixed in 1 Cup of Raisins and 1 Tsp. of cinnamon with a dash of nutmeg and it turned out great.

  25. To DIANE WHITE. I note that you did not get a reply to your comment that you need a substitute for eggs, and that you can’t have dairy. Be advised that eggs are not dairy, if that is your concern about using them.

  26. DIANE WHITE says:

    THANKS FOR REPLYING. I CANNOT HAVE EGGS THAT IS WHY I SAID A SUBSTITUTE FOR EGGS. I DID FIND AN EGG REPLACER WHICH DID SEEM TO WORK. GOING TO TRY THE BREAD AGAIN TODAY. I DID NOT BAKE LONG ENOUGH. IT LOOKED BROWN ON THE TOP SO TOOK OUT TOO SOON. BUT A VERY TASTY BREAD AND VERY EASY TO MAKE. I DO MINE IN THE OVEN. THANKS AGAIN FOR THE REPLY.

  27. Hi, I live in Samoa and getting GF flours and products is virutally impossible. Was very excited tp try this recipe last nite. We cant get xanthan gum here so i used the gelatine. Bread turned out fine – way better than the ready made GF breads we brought from New Zealand over xmas. except the children complained it left a slight sour aftertase in the mouth? Im not sure why that would be? Is it the yeast or the vinegar that gives it that taste? I didnt have cider vinegar – used white vinegar – could that be why? Am going to try recipe again today (even though they complained my 2 Gf daughters ate the entire loaf ….) The sound of raisins and cinnamon sounds delish too.
    Thanks so much for your site and the great recipes. I like how you give step by step instructions.
    Lani from Samoa.

  28. Dan Childers says:

    Those having problems getting it to rise, I suggest mixing the dough more thoroughly. The first two times I followed this recipe, the bread was pretty flat, but the last time I got out my hand mixer and blended the heck out of it until it was as smooth as whipped cream.

    When I put it in the bread machine then, it finally rose like it was supposed to.

  29. I have made the bread twice. Both times the center caves in. Is this normal? I don’t have a bread machine. So I let it rise in a 150 degree oven and when it is over the top of pan then I take it out and turn the oven up to 350. I baked for 40 mins. that wasn’t enough so tomorrow I will try an hour. I have active and instant dry yeast. Can I use the instant dry yeast instead of active. My neighbor wants to try this recipe also so need to know if cave in is normal and if time and temp is correct and using instant yeast. It is a very tasty bread and love the texture. Beats what you buy at health food stores. Yuk. Thanks for your help.

  30. I have your Answer. You overproofed the bread. That mean that you let it rise too long. Only let it rise until it is almost to the top and then kick up the oven to 375. Take it in about 60 minutes after that when it has an internal temp of 205-210. Also, if you want it fluffier, add an extra egg.

  31. I have your Answer. You overproofed the bread. That means that you let it rise too long. Only let it rise until it is almost to the top and then kick up the oven to 375. Take it in about 60 minutes after that when it has an internal temp of 205-210. Also, if you want it fluffier, add an extra egg.

  32. FYI – i always use active dry yeast. when i add the extra egg, i add a quarter cup more of flour.

  33. Hi there, I’m very new to the GF world. I have now made 2 loaves of bread in my new to me, used bread machine. They turned out great tasting, but not a great sandwich bread. Yours sounds great and I’d love to try it, but the instructions for the machine says to use the Whole Wheat bread setting which consists of :
    Normal Rapid
    1st knead=13 mins ”
    1st rise = 5 mins ”
    2nd knead= 20 mins ”
    2nd rise = 70 mins 30 mins.
    shape = 20 secs ”
    final rise = 72 mins ”
    Baking time= 4 hours 3 hrs. 20 mins
    Is either one of these settings okay to use? I really hate to waste the dough, and there is no way to set it to just cook for 80 mins.
    Please help, thank you so much. I love this site, soooo much information.

  34. @Lori,

    The bread machine that is referred to has a setting specifically for gluten free breads. This dough isn’t anything like bread making using regular flour, which is kind of like slop, so traditional methods will not work. I’ve had to shelve my breadmaker until the time I can bake regular bread again (I don’t have celiac or an intolerance to wheat; I’m adopting this gluten free lifestyle to help overcome a serious illness)

    My suggestion to make gluten free bread, is to mix the dough with a paddle in a mixing machine (I use my Kitchen Aid) for about 5 minutes and transfer to a greased bread pan to let rise in a warm place, out of the draft, for about 20 minutes. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and bake for approximately 60 minutes.

    Diana

  35. JODIE, DO YOU THINK I SHOULD BEAT THE DOUGH FOR A COUPLE MINUTES? I HAVE READ WHERE SOME HAVE DONE THIS. I JUST WANT A NICE LOAF OF BREAD. I MAY TRY AN EXTRA EGG AS IT IS VERY DENSE. I USE EGG REPLACER WHICH SEEMS TO WORK FINE. I ASKED ABOUT THE INSTANT YEAST AS I HAVE A TON OF IT. IF IT ISN’T RIGHT I WON’T USE IT. THANKS FOR INFO.

  36. Yup. See above. After everything is mixed together (flour, egg and vinegar mixture), take out your electric mixer and mix on high for 2-3 minutes. (This is what puts the holes in the bread that make it seem so “bread-like”) Then, let it rise until just below the top of the pan at 175 or so, and then I just keep it in the oven and kick it up to 375 for another 60 minutes or so until it reaches a 210 temp internally. I use a different flour combo than the one on this site but I’m sure it’ll come out awesome – my combos are based on the same concepts as here.

    Can’t tell you about the instant yeast. I’ve never used it – or the egg replacer. I just add the extra eggs because I don’t use the soy flour (recommended here) and the protein helps the bread rise – I think.

    Good Luck. Let me know how it comes out.
    Jodi

  37. Diane: Here is my flour mix.

    1 1/4 cup of brown rice flour, 1/2 cup of potato starch, 1 cup of corn starch. I used three eggs instead of two, and 2 tsp of vinegar instead of 1, and 2 tbs of oil instead of 1. The rest of the recipe remains the same except that I took the advice above and after everything is mixed together I beat everything for 3-4 minutes with the electric mixer. Totally insane fluffy bread. My bread looked like a boule and my entire family ate it with gusto (celiac and not)

  38. :(
    I made this and it smelled and tasted sooooooooooo “yeasty” that I took 1 bite and had to throw it away. What could I have done wrong? I followed it exactly and used the exact ingredients. I’ve had this happen with a few other breads I’ve tried too. Actually I still haven’t been able to make a bread suitable to use as sandwich bread. They either don’t rise or the taste is really yeasty beyond being edible.

  39. DIANE WHITE says:

    JODIE, YOU HAVE BEEN AN IMMENSE HELP WITH THIS BREAD. FINALLY A GOOD LOAF. I DIDN’T USE YOUR FLOURS AS I ALREADY HAD THESE FLOURS MIXED. I LET IT RISE IN 150 DEGREE OVEN AND JUST UPPED IT TO 375 FOR 1 HR. AND IT CAME OUT LIKE A LOAF OF BREAD. JUST NOT AS HIGH. I WAS SO PROUD OF THAT LOAF. I ALSO BEAT IT FOR 3 MINUTES. I USE THIS TYPE OF BREAD AS MY NEW WAY OF EATING IS NO MEAT, NO DAIRY, AND NO EGGS. AND THEY PREFER YOU DON’T USE WHEAT. IT HAS TAKEN ME OUT OF PAIN AND THAT IS WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR. HAD EVERY THING DOWN PAT CEPT THE BREAD. THANKS TO YOU I HAVE THAT FIGURED OUT NOW ALSO. DO YOU THINK AN EXTRA EGG WOULD MAKE IT QUITE NOT SO DENSE. PRETTY HEAVY. THANKS AGAIN, YOU WERE A BIG HELP.

  40. Diane:

    Thanks. Glad to hear how I helped you out! I’ve been working off of this recipe for over a year … and ever since I added the third egg, it became a much fluffier, less dense loaf.
    How many eggs are you using. Three was the magic number for me. Also, the mixing with a mixer for four minutes at the end also helps a lot as well.
    Finally, I think the Masa Harina flour is a little dense. I tried my recipe last night with Masa Harina flour and it was not even close to as fluffy as the loafs I usually bake.
    I would try my flour mixture with the three whole eggs (two at a minimum), or if you want to cut out the yolks, do it with 6 egg whites. My girlfriend did it that way and it was amazing. Let me know how it goes. Yours, Jodi

  41. Hi – Jodi just want to say a very big thank you for sharing your recipe. I just tried it today and the bread rose so high and was absoloutely delicious. I loved it ( and im not the celiac in the family). I beat it with the electric beater for several minutes like u said. Then put it all into bread machine and used regular quick cycle. I didnt have potato starch so used corn starch instead. I think the 3 eggs realy made a diff as well.
    Thank you.

  42. I really enjoy reading these posts and improving upon this great recipe. I seem to have a different problem. My bread rises over the edges down the sides of the pan and much of the batter is lost. Even if I only let it rise a half hour this happens. I increased the eggs to 3 and the bread was good, but bigger than ever (and very messy). What type of pan is everyone using for baking this bread? Is there a particular type of yeast that is recommended? I am using one of the little pouches of Hodgson Mill yeast.

  43. Debbie:

    In some locations (based on heat or altitude) bread rises quicker than other places. Go on line and just look at the regular bread baking sites for more information on this.
    Try only letting it rise until right before the top of the pan – whether that takes five minutes or 20 minutes and then put it in a 375 oven. I use either a glass loaf ban or clay pans from pampered chef. Either one is good. I also use Hodgson Mill active yeast. So it has to be the temp/altitude and your letting it rise too long.

  44. I’m fairly new to this site but have had success with everything I’ve tried. Question, tho, on the sandwich bread. I did it exactly per Mary Frances’ directions the first time and it turned out too dense & wet. The next time, I added 1/2 c more flour (almond flour, actually, for protein & flavor) and baked an additional 20 minutes. It came out much better, edible, tho I have to toast it. It’s still a little dense and wet. What am I doing wrong? I’m using a bread machine, btw. Mixing it by hand, then dumping it in machine and using bake setting.
    Oh, and thank you thank you thank you for the pizza crust recipe. It was delicious!

    • @Tobi: how long does your machine rise and bake on the bake setting? My 80 minute setting is a 2 minute knead, followed by an 18 minute knead, then 12 minute rise, and 48 minute bake. However, since I don’t use the blade my bread is really rising for 32 minutes.

  45. I am new to cooking gluten free bread and have tried the really good sandwich bread recipe several times. I have finally got all the ingredients right sort of. I cannot get masa harina but I have bought some corn tortilla and ground them to a fine crumb and used that. I have mixed all the ingredients in my mixer for several minutes with a dough hook and them put in my bread machine. I do not have a rapid bake setting so I have put my bread machine on for an hour and it has gone through all the mixing of the flour and then I put the dough in the pan and put it in the bread machine for the last 90 minutes with out the paddle. So it rises and cooks fo this time. It rises OK but it is still wet and dense. Is gluten free bread always going to be like that or can I do something else to make it more of a dry consistency.

    • Hi Lucia, Gluten free bread definitely does not have to be wet and dense. If you can’t find masa harina where you live, then you’ll probably have better results using a recipes for which you can get all of the ingredients and follow the baking directions exactly. The Gluten Free Mommy, Karina’s Kitchen, and Ginger Lemon Girl blogs all have great bread recipes, so I’d suggest that you try one of those next.

  46. I just can’t seem to end up with a good gluten free bread! My son is allergic (so far) to gluten, dairy, corn and egg. I haven’t had good result using various homemade egg substitutes and I can’t use EnerG egg replacer because it contains corn. I’ll take any suggestions you can come up with. I’m getting desperate!!!

    • @Pam, check the bread recipes on Karina’s Kitchen blog. Karina has a lot of food allergies including all of the ones above, I believe. Hopefully her recipes will work for you without any substitutions.

  47. My bread machine’s bake setting is just that…bake. No mixing involved. I don’t know how much of that time is rising, it doesn’t indicate to me. Do you think that’s the problem tho, that it’s not baking long enough? I made another loaf last week to try it….and then I got hit with a bug and didn’t eat anything but rice for 3 days *sigh*….so, I have to bake again!

    • @Tobi: I do think that bake setting may be the problem. Since your machine doesn’t have an express setting, I’d try using the regular bread cycle, or baking a loaf in the oven (see instructions that people have left in the comments).

  48. This bread is SO easy, I don’t even use my bread machine at all. I like seeing and controlling all the aspects of the process. The bread is tall, fluffy and my husband says it is better than anything you can buy. I make several modifications to the original recipe. 3 eggs and really beat it for a good 4 minutes. Since the dough is not thick, it is as easy to mix with a mixer as cake batter. I also substitute sorghum for the soy flour. It is sweeter and my husband likes it better. I use tapioca flour instead of the masa harina. I like Hodgson Mill yeast, and it works so quickly, it is usually risen to the top of the pan within 20 minutes and so I bake it immediately after that. Try doing it all yourself and you may be pleasantly surprised. Good luck.

    • @Debbie: Thanks for commenting with your modifications. I think that I have most of those ingredients on hand, so I’ll give it a shot. The experimenting never ends with gluten free baking =)

  49. JODIE, I JUST HAD TO TAKE A MOMENT TO LET YOU KNOW YOUR RECIPE FOR BREAD IS INCREDIBLE. I MADE IT YESTERDAY AND YOOHOO IT CAME OUT LIKE A GIANT. THE TASTE AND TEXTURE IS PERFECT. NO LONGER DENSE AND WET. THANK YOU SO MUCH. I USE THE EGG REPLACER FOR 3 EGGS AND I USED ONE TSP OF VINEGAR AS I FORGOT AND USED OLD RECIPE. STILL PERFECT. CAN YOU USE THIS FOR A PIZZA DOUGH OR DO YOU HAVE ANOTHER RECIPE FOR PIZZA DOUGH. READY TO TACKLE THAT NOW. WHEN YOU TOAST THAT BREAD IT IS FABULOUS. EVERYONE SHOULD FOLLOW THE RECIPE YOU HAVE AND THEN THEY WON’T HAVE ANY FRUSTATIONS WITH THEIR BREAD. IT IS FOOL PROOF. THANKS AGAIN DIANE

  50. Diane: You made my day! Thanks so much for the compliment. I have been playing around with this recipe, with Mary Frances’s as a base, for over a year and am glad to share it! And glad it came out so well.
    As for the pizza dough, I have tried using my recipe but it doesn’t come out as great. However, I did find a good recipe for gf bread on emeril green. He did a gluten free episode which you can find on the web and his technique is excellent so watch the video.
    I used his recipe with my flour mix, and his technique and the pizza came out awesome. I cooked mine in the oven first, and then oiled up the grill, put it on super hot and put the partially cooked dough on the grilll. I flipped it after a few minutes once it was crispy on the part that was on the grill. I then put the put less cooked side down on an aluminum pizza pan, put the toppings on the crispy side and cooked it some more on the grill and it was awesome. Let me know how it goes. Jodi

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